Stephanie Dawrs

Stephanie Dawrs

Laboratory Researcher Technician – Honda Lab 
DawrsS@njhealth.org

Education:

University of Hawai’i at Hilo, BS, Biology

Background:

Stephanie graduated from the University of Hawai’i at Hilo with a bachelor’s degree in Biology with an emphasis in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation and a minor in Chemistry. While at the University of Hawai’i she took part in several research projects studying Hawaiian soil bacterial diversity, the relationship between ambrosia beetles and the transmission of the fungal plant pathogens that cause rapid ohia death, and fruit fly genetics. In June 2018, Stephanie joined the Honda lab where her current research projects include: assessing the relationship between NTM and Kilauea volcanic ash, environmental sample processing, studying factors that impact NTM colony variation, and in vitro studies to investigate gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) as a risk factor of NTM lung disease. In her spare time, she enjoys hiking, rock climbing, camping, and skiing. 

Grant Norton

Grant Norton

Laboratory Researcher Technician -Honda Lab
NortonG@njhealth.org

Education:

University of Denver, BS, Molecular Biology

Background: 

Grant graduated from the University of Denver with a BS Molecular Biology and a minor in Chemistry. As an undergraduate, Grant contributed to molecular genetics research focused on characterizing the cell biology associated with a neurodegenerative disease model in Drosophila. At National Jewish Health, his work in the Honda Lab aims to better understand aspects of the molecular pathogenesis of NTM. Currently, Grant is interested in understanding how environmental reservoirs such as free-living amoebae influence genomic and virulence changes in NTM. Outside of National Jewish Health Grant enjoys roller blading, homebrewing and cooking. 

Ravleen Virdi

Ravleen Virdi

Laboratory Researcher Technician – Honda Lab 
VirdiR@njhealth.org

Education:

Bharati Vidyapeeth University India, BS Biology
University of East Anglia UK, MS in Biotechnology
Georgia State University, MS in Biology

Background:

While a graduate student, Ravleen worked to understand the variation of protein levels in the intestinal brush border during foodborne infections. This led to a Master’s degree in Biology with a concentration in Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry from Georgia State University and a graduate research project performing transcriptomic analyses of acute heavy metals exposure on the apoptotic response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. She is currently determining the environmental niches enriching for NTM growth in Hawai’i and is genetically profiling island-specific NTM to better understand how environmental influences, host factors, and the NTM organisms interact to facilitate emergence of NTM lung disease. Her work also seeks to understand the varying degrees of virulence between different strains of NTM species. In her free time Ravleen likes to bake, read, paint, and spend time with family.