Brian P. O'Connor
Assistant Professor
Office of Academic Affairs
Center for Genes, Environment, and Health
Department of Pediatrics
Division of Cell Biology
  • 5280 Top Doctors 2016
  • Recognized as a 5280 Top Doctor
  • America’s Top Doctors 2015 — Castle Connolly, Medical, Ltd.
  • Recognized in America’s Top Doctors — Castle Connolly, Inc.
  • Best Doctors in America® 2015 — Best Doctors, Inc.
  • Recognized in Best Doctors in America® — Best Doctors, Inc.
  • America’s Top Doctors 2016 — Castle Connolly Medical, Ltd.
  • image descriptionPrograms & Services
    Research AreasResearch Areas
    • Allergy
    • Epigenetics
    • Genomics
    • Histone Biology
    • Immunobiology

    Special Interests

    Research Interets

    In recent years, epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone modification and DNA methylation, have been identified which, translate environmental signals into gene regulation. These molecular epigenetic processes, translate the myriad environmental signals encountered each day, into definitive regulation of our genome, and by extension, who we are at a basic biological level. Dr. O’Connor’s work focuses on understanding at a molecular and organismal level, how epigenetic mechanisms regulate the decision processes governing immune cell activity in the context of disease. The immune system is comprised of multiple types of autonomous cells that must work together to influence the outcome of disease. Currently, Dr. O’Connor’s lab examines the cross talk between environmental stimuli (such as diet or inflammation), the immune system, and disease (such as Asthma).

    Education

    Education
    Dartmouth College, Immunology, PhD
    Fellowship
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Postdoctoral Fellow

    Publications

    Yi Jia, Katsuyuki Takeda, Junyan Han, Anthony Joetham, Roland A. Marcus, Joseph J. Lucas, Brian P. O’Connor*, and Erwin W. Gelfand*. IL-4 induces epigenetic and phenotypic conversion of CD8+ T cells from IFN- to IL-13-producing cells that mediate airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. (2012).

    O'Connor, B.P.; Eun,S.-Y.; Zhengmao, Y.; Zozulya, A.L.; Lich, J.D.; Moore, C.B.; Iocca, H.A.; Roney, K.E.; Holl, E.K.; Wu, Q.P.; van Deventer, H.W.; Fabry, Z and Ting, J.P.-Y. Semaphorin 6D regulates the late phase of CD4+ T cell primary immune responses. PNAS, 2008, Sept. 2, vol.105, no.35: 13015-13020.

    O’Connor, B.P.*; Vogel, L.A.*; Zhang, W.; Loo, W.; Shnider, D.; Lind, E.F.; Ratliff, M.; Noelle, R.J.; Erickson, L.D. Imprinting the Fate of Antigen-Reactive B cells through the Affinity of the B cell Receptor. J. of Immunology. 2006 Dec 1; 177 (11).

    O'Connor BP*; Raman VS*; Erickson LD*; Cook WJ; Weaver LK; Ahonen C; Lin LL; Mantchev GT; Bram RJ; Noelle RJ. BCMA Is Essential for the Survival of Long-lived Bone Marrow Plasma Cells. Journal of Experimental Medicine. 2004 Jan 5;199(1): 91-8. O'Connor BP; Cascalho M; Noelle RJ. Short and Long-Lived Bone Marrow Plasma Cells are Derived from a Novel Plasma Cell Precursor Population. Journal of Experimental Medicine. 2002, Vol.195, No.6, 737-745.

    * denotes co-author

    Contact Information

    • Office: 303.270.2754
    • Email: oconnorb@njhealth.org

     

    Locations

    • National Jewish Health Main Campus
      1400 Jackson St.
      Denver, CO 80206

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