Peter M. Henson, MD, PhD, BVMS

Peter M. Henson
Professor
Department of Biomedical Research
Department of Pediatrics
Division of Cell Biology
  • 5280 Top Doctors 2016
  • Recognized as a 5280 Top Doctor
  • America’s Top Doctors 2015 — Castle Connolly, Medical, Ltd.
  • Recognized in America’s Top Doctors — Castle Connolly, Inc.
  • Best Doctors in America® 2015 — Best Doctors, Inc.
  • Recognized in Best Doctors in America® — Best Doctors, Inc.
  • America’s Top Doctors 2016 — Castle Connolly Medical, Ltd.
  • image descriptionPrograms & Services
    Research AreasResearch Areas
    • Allergy
    • Basic Immunology
    • Cellular and Molecular Biology
    • Inflammation
    • Lung Cell Biology
    • Mycobacterial and Respiratory Infections
    • Pathology
    • Pulmonary Medicine
    • Regenerative Medicine

    Special Interests

    Innate immunity, experimental pathology, Inflammation and inflammmatory respiratory diseases

    Education

    Education
    University of Cambridge, PhD
    University of Edinburgh, BSc with Honors, Microbiology
    University of Edinburgh, BVM&S
    Fellowship
    Scripps Research Institute, Experimental Pathology

    Awards & Recognition

    2011: Distinguished Professorship, University of Colorado
    2005: Burns Amberson Lecture, ATS Centenary Meeting
    1991: Margaret A. Regan Professor of Pulmonary Inflammation
    1983: Reticuloendothelial Society, Marie T. Bonazinga Award
    1980:American Association of Pathologists, Parke Davis Award

    Publications

    Fadok VA, Voelker DR, Campbell PA, Cohen JJ, Bratton DL and Henson PM. Exposure of phosphatidylserine on the surface of apoptotic lymphocytes triggers specific recognition and removal by macrophages. J Immunol. 148(7):2207-2216, 1992.

    Fadok VA, Bratton DL, Konowal A, Freed PW, Westcott JY, Henson PM. Macrophages that have ingested apoptotic cells in vitro inhibit proinflammatory cytokine production through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms involving TGFβ, PGE2, and PAF. J. Clin. Invest. 101:890-898, 1998.  Huynh, M-LN, Fadok VA, Henson PM. Phosphatidylserine-dependent ingestion of apoptotic cells promotes TGFβ1 secretion and resolution of inflammation. J Clin Invest 109:41-50, 2002.

    Gardai S.J, McPhillips KA, Frasch SC, Janssen W.J, Starefeldt A, Murphy-Ullrich JE, Bratton DL, Oldenborg PA, Michalak M, Henson PM. Cell-surface calreticulin initiates clearance of viable or apoptotic cells through trans-activation of LRP on the phagocyte. Cell 123:321-334, 2005.

    Gardai SJ, Xiao Y-Q, Dickinson M, Nick J, Voelker D, Greene K, Henson P. By binding SIRPα or calreticulin/CD91, lung collectins act as dual function surveillance molecules to suppress or enhance inflammation. Cell. 115:13-23, 2003.

    Desch AN, Gibbings SL, Clambey ET, Janssen WJ, Slansky JE, Kedl RM, Henson PM, and Jakubzick C. Dendritic cell subsets require cis-activation for cytotoxic CD8 T-cell induction. Nature communications, 5:4674 2014.

    Academic Affiliations

    Professor, Departments of Immunology and Microbiology, Medicine, Pharmacology, University of Colorado Denver

     

    Teaching & Professional Positions

    Associate Director, Pulmonary and Critical Care Fellowship Program
    Member, Immunology Graduate Program Steering Committee

    Contact Information

    • Office: 877.225.5654
    • Fax: 303.398.1381

     

    Locations

    • National Jewish Health Main Campus
      1400 Jackson St.
      Denver, CO 80206

    Patient Ratings

    The Patient Rating score is an average of all responses to care provider related questions on our independent rating system, the Press Ganey Patient Satisfaction Survey.

    Responses are measured on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the best score. Learn more about our patient satisfaction survey.
     
     

    Comments

    Comments are collected in our Press Ganey Patient Satisfaction Surveys. Patients are de-identified to protect confidentiality and patient privacy. Learn more about our patient satisfaction survey.