Sarah Sasse, PhD

Sarah Sasse
Staff Research Faculty Member
Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine
Department of Medicine
Research AreasResearch Areas
  • Airway Biology
  • Glucocorticoid Receptor Signaling
  • Inflammatory Regulation
  • Transcriptional Regulation
  • Asthma

Special Interests

Asthma is a complex disorder involving excessive inflammatory signaling and pathologic structural remodeling of the airway, both of which contribute to reduced lung function and associated symptoms. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is one of the most commonly targeted molecules in the treatment of asthma, yet the mechanisms by which GR signaling suppresses airway inflammation, and how (or whether) GR action reverses pathologic remodeling, are not well understood. My research investigates both of these important areas by utilizing standard techniques in molecular biology (qPCR, ChIP-qPCR, reporter assays) and cutting edge next-generation/genomic tools (RNA-seq, ChIP-seq, GRO-seq) in culture models of human airway cell populations. Through these studies, I have developed substantial expertise in the molecular biology of gene regulation and a general interest in the relationships between gene regulation, genetic variation, therapeutics and lung disease.

Education

Education
University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, PhD, Psychology and Neuroscience
University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, MA, Psychology
University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, BA, Psychology

Contact Information

  • Office: 303.270.2069
  • Email: sasses@njhealth.org

 

Locations

  • National Jewish Health Main Campus
    1400 Jackson St.
    Denver, CO 80206

Patient Ratings

The Patient Rating score is an average of all responses to care provider related questions on our independent rating system, the Press Ganey Patient Satisfaction Survey.

Responses are measured on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the best score. Learn more about our patient satisfaction survey.
 
 

Comments

Comments are collected in our Press Ganey Patient Satisfaction Surveys. Patients are de-identified to protect confidentiality and patient privacy. Learn more about our patient satisfaction survey.