Pediatric Rehabilitation Services

The pediatric rehabilitation services consist of Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Recreation Therapy and Speech Language Pathology (Speech Therapy).

These programs are for the evaluation and treatment of children with:

  • Asthma
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Immunodeficiencies
  • Rheumatologic conditions
  • Swallowing disorders
  • Voice disorders
  • Vocal cord dysfunction
  • Chronic cough
  • Other pulmonary diseases

Our goal is to enable any child to lead a full and satisfying life within his/her family, school and community. This goal is achieved through the recognition, assessment, treatment and management of symptoms and limitations arising from chronic illness.

Learn more about our pediatric rehabilitation evaluations and treatments.

 

Physical Therapy

Physical therapy seeks to enhance physical performance. Physical therapists (PTs) will examine, treat, and teach you to prevent, correct and limit physical disability, movement dysfunction, bodily malfunction and pain from injury, illness and/or disease. PTs use physical measures, activities and devices to help you. These can include:

  • Orthopedics/ Manual Therapy
  • Intramuscular Manual Therapy (trigger point dry needling)
  • Heat and Massage Therapy
  • Cardiopulmonary and Resistance Training
  • Recreational Therapy to focus on a return to your previous activity level

Five Program Objectives

  1. Increase cardiopulmonary endurance.
  2. Improve muscle strength and endurance.
  3. Improve ability to participate in daily activities in home, school and community.
  4. Increase and encourage continued participation in physical education, leisure and fitness activities.
  5. Improve awareness of abdominal breathing, voice control and/or swallowing.

 

 

When to Get a Referral

You may want to consider getting a referral to the National Jewish Health Pediatric Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program if your child has any of the following symptoms or issues:

  • History of exercise induced asthma (bronchospasm)
  • Inability to exercise due to deconditioning
  • Muscle weakness/fatigue
  • Poor pacing and self-monitoring skills
  • History of oral steroid use or frequent burst of steroids
  • Osteoporosis or risk factors for osteoporosis
  • Gait abnormalities
  • Orthopedic dysfunction's
  • Postural Abnormalities
  • Pain that limits motion and/or function
  • Problems with coordination
  • Developmental delays
  • Cognitive school issues
  • Vocational issues
  • Leisure issues
  • Decreasing ability to complete activities of daily living
  • Choking / coughing while eating
  • Food refusal
  • Difficulty being understood by teachers or peers
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