Your Rights as a Patient

Professional Care:

  • You have the right to care that is considerate and respectful.
  • You have the right to care that is impartial regardless of gender, race, color, sexual orientation, religion, disability, or age.
  • You have the right to access National Jewish Health rules that affect you and your treatment.

Participate in Care Decisions:

  • You have the right to participate in decisions about your care. Your family may also participate in care decisions, when appropriate and authorized by you.
  • You have the right to receive information that is accurate and easy to understand. This includes information about your diagnosis, the care that is suggested, the risks involved in the treatment or procedure, outcomes of care (including unanticipated outcomes), and the cost of care. With this information you can make informed decisions about your care.
  • You have a right to give your informed consent before any procedure is performed. If you speak another language, have a physical or mental disability, or just do not understand something, support will be provided so you can make informed healthcare decisions.

Treatment:

  • You have the right to refuse treatment at any time, to the extent permitted by law. Should you refuse care, your healthcare team will inform you of the possible medical consequences of your decision.
  • You have the right to refuse participation in a research study without compromising your access to other healthcare services.
  • You have the right to appropriate assessment and treatment of pain.
  • You have the right to prepare an advance directive. You can appoint another person to make healthcare decisions on your behalf to the extent permitted by law. National Jewish Health personnel will comply with the directives. You may revoke or revise your advance directive at any time.
  • You have the right to receive treatment, care and services within the National Jewish Health mission, capabilities and in compliance with related laws and regulations.

Confidentiality of Care:

  • You have the right to privacy.
  • You have the right to expect that your medical records will be kept confidential. Access to information about you will be limited to those involved in your care. Your medical records will be released only in cases of medical emergencies or in response to court-ordered subpoenas. You may provide written consent for release to persons or organizations.

Access to Medical Records:

  • You have the right to access your medical record, except when restricted by law.
  • You have the right to have any information in the record explained to you.

Caregivers:

  • You have the right to know the names and roles of people directly involved in your care. People will wear official nametags or be introduced to you.
  • You have to right to know of any business relations National Jewish Health has that may influence your care.

Continuity of Care:

  • You have the right to continuity of care. National Jewish Health will help with this. This includes help locating services or facilities when medically indicated. Your doctor may suggest that you receive care at another facility. If so, your doctor will advise you of the reasons for the transfer, the risks involved, and possible options.
  • You have the right to help in obtaining a second opinion from another doctor at your request and expense.

Patient Billing:

  • You have the right to have your bill explained to you. This will be provided upon request, regardless of the source of payment. You may ask about financial aid to assist you in the payment of your bills. You can expect help from National Jewish Health staff in securing such aid.

Other Rights:

  • You have the right to have access to visitors, telephone calls, mail, and an interpreter, if needed.
  • You have the right to be free from mental, physical, sexual, and verbal abuse, neglect, and exploitation.
  • You have the right to access National Jewish Health Security.
  • You have the right to pastoral care and other spiritual services. You may express your spiritual beliefs and cultural practices provided that they do not harm others or interfere with your planned course of medical therapy.
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