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Pediatric Asthma: Weather


Many times, asthma symptoms occur with changes in the weather. However, there is no one type of climate which is good or bad for all children with asthma. Some children develop asthma symptoms on rainy days, while others have difficulty in hot, dry weather. Cold winter days may be difficult for children who are sensitive to cold air, but the winter is a time of welcome relief for those with pollen allergies.

 

Should We Move?

We do not generally recommend moving to a different part of the country to improve asthma. There is no “best” location for children with asthma to live. Sometimes relocation may seem to produce an improvement in asthma. Whether this is due to a different climate, avoidance of certain allergens or other factors is unknown. Most commonly, moving provides only temporary or no improvement, and it is very difficult to predict.

Our best advice is this: work with your doctor on understanding things that make asthma worse and on developing a management plan to keep your child’s asthma well controlled. Then, if you still want to move, discuss this option with your doctor. Remember, there is no guarantee that your child’s asthma will improve or stay improved if it does get better.

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Asthma Treatment Program

At National Jewish Health, we offer a range of treatment programs to meet the specific needs of patients with mild to severe asthma.

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